© 2020 The Nourished Seedling, All Rights Reserved

 

  • Black Facebook Icon
  • Black Twitter Icon
  • Black YouTube Icon
  • Black Pinterest Icon
  • Black Instagram Icon

Almond and Oat Gluten Free Chocolate Chip Cookies

January 29, 2018

 

 

Yields:  about 28-30 cookies   Prep Time:  20 minutes       Total Time:  45 minutes

 

These cookies are reminiscent of a traditional soft chocolate chip cookie but offer so much more!  Made mostly with a combination of almond and oat flour, these little morsels are loaded with fiber, iron and vitamin E.  Honey replaces some of the refined sugar, and less than half the butter from traditional chocolate chip cookies.

 

Ingredients

6 tablespoons softened butter

1/2 cup cane sugar

2 eggs

1 teaspoon unsulphured molasses

1/4 cup high quality honey

1 cup oat flour*

1 cup almond flour

1/2 cup brown rice flour

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon Himalayan salt

1/4 cup finely diced walnuts (optional)

 

1/2 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips

 

*For oat flour, I take 1 cup of old fashioned rolled oats and run them through a handheld coffee grinder and within seconds I have home-ground oat flour.  1 cup of the oats produces 1 cup of the flour.

 

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit.

 

2. Mix softened butter, cane sugar, honey and molasses in a bowl.  Add in eggs and mix well.

 

 

3. Slowly pour in 1 cup oat flour, 1 cup almond flour**, 1/2 cup brown rice flour, baking soda and salt.  Mix everything together until well combined. 

**I have an affiliate link in the ingredients to a high quality almond flour I use, however, Trader Joe’s has started carrying an almond flour that also works well for this recipe.

 

4. Add in chocolate chips and mix well.

 

5. I prefer a lined tray (parchment paper or silicone mat) for easier cleanup.  Scoop a generous tablespoon of dough onto a lined baking tray, spacing about 2 inches apart.

 

 

6. Bake at 375 degrees for 8 to 10 minutes (9 minutes was perfect for me) and remove from oven. 

 

 

7. It is incredibly important to LET THE COOKIES COOL when you remove from the oven.  The sugars will be hot, and everything will fall apart if you try to move them to a cooling rack right away.  Wait at least 5 minutes, and then move to a cooling rack to completely cool.

 

8. I store these in the freezer because I feel it really keeps them fresh.  Other times, we keep in a cookie jar on the counter if I know they are going to go fast.  Storing in the refrigerator is a happy medium.

 (Don't mind the 'E' on my little one's hand.  Markers have a hard time staying on the paper...)

 

Gluten free goods have calmed down a bit as far as health claims, but I still feel there is a misnomer about all gluten free foods being healthier than non-gluten free foods (for those that are not on a medically necessary gluten free diet).  Many commercialized products have removed wheat, which can be a nutritious ingredient with vitamins, minerals and fiber, and replaced it with empty calories in starches (ie: potato starch, corn starch, etc.).  Here is a little more on gluten.

 

So, when I go to make something gluten free, I recognize I am taking out some nutrients, and instead of just filling that space with any old flour, I like to take the opportunity to add back in as much nutrition as possible.  Almond flour has become a lot more popular these days, especially with grain free diets.  I am a firm believer in balance and moderation, and while I do like to use almond flour, I use it moderately.  It takes a lot of almonds to make a cup of almond flour, so I like to combine this flour with other nutrient dense flours, such as oat.

 

 

Oats are loaded with fiber, iron, vitamins, minerals and even immune-supporting beta-glucan.  I prefer to keep the old-fashioned oats on hand and grind them as necessary to keep the oats as fresh as possible.  As I mentioned above, a coffee grinder works wonders for this task!

 

I reduced the butter to less than half a cup, relying on some of the healthier fat in the almond flour and the eggs to add moisture.  I replaced some of the cane sugar with less refined honey.  It still is a sugar, yet has some vitamins and minerals to contribute as opposed to the more refined cane sugar.

 

The best part is that these cookies are delicious.  They don’t taste like cardboard, but instead an irresistible soft cookie with bites of chocolate throughout a flavor-filled dough.  I’m not necessarily a big cookies-and-milk-for-snack-time type of gal, but with these cookies, I am all for a treat like this that also packs a nutritional punch.

 

Pin on Pinterest!

 

 

 

Please reload

Please reload

AFFILIATE DISCLOSURE
This website, including this page, contains affiliate links.  This means that The Nourished Seedling may receive a percentage of any product you purchase when using the links in the posts, articles or recipes. There is no difference in the price of the products, yet your purchase supports the mission of The Nourished Seedling to help people to reach optimal health by living a healthy and balanced life.  Thank you for your support!

For more informtion on affiliates and disclaimers, please click here.

Please reload

Please feel free to leave a comment!

*PLEASE NOTE* Anywhere you are asked for your email on this site, it is to verify you are a human (not a robot/computer).  Your email address will NEVER be published or sold.